From Fantasy To Reality: Xenotransplantation

Emily BurkeCocktail Fodder, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Genomics

TRANSPLANTING ORGANS FROM ANIMALS INTO HUMANS Every ten minutes, a new person is added to the national transplant waiting list. A little more than 75,000 people are active waiting list candidates — meaning they are medically eligible for transplantation according to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. Over the past decade, the gap between organ supply and demand has continued to grow; … Read More

The Science Of CRISPR/Cas9

Emily BurkeBiologics, Business of Biotech, Cancer, Clinical Trials, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Development, Drug Targets, Genetics, Genomics, Mechanism of Action, Ribonucleic Acid (RNA)

CRISPR/CAS9 UPDATE As CRISPR/Cas9 adds new indications to its resume, legal battles over its IP continue to be waged in the US and Europe. On the clinical front, CRISPR/Cas9 entered its first human trial at Sichuan University (Chengdu, China) last fall for metastatic lung cancer, and is widely expected to do so in the U.S. by the end of the year. This … Read More

Cell Signaling Explained

Emily BurkeBiotech Basics, Cancer, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), The WEEKLY

UNDERSTANDING THE DISEASE PROCESS Greetings from BIO 2017! It’s been a busy week here at the BIO International Convention here in San Diego, CA. At our convention booth, this year’s giveaway was our book written especially for non-scientists: The Biotech Primer: An insider’s guide to the biotech and pharma industry. If you weren’t at the convention to stop by and … Read More

Epigenome: Writing, Reading & Erasing

Emily BurkeCancer, Clinical Trials, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Development, Drug Targets, Genomics, Mechanism of Action, Small Molecule Drugs

FOUNDATIONS OF EPIGENETICS Genetic mutations — changes in the order of the A, C, G, and T nucleotide bases that make up a gene — have been the primary focus of cancer researchers over the last several decades. By sussing out mutations involved in regulating cell growth and division, scientists better understand the molecular range of different cancers and consequently develop … Read More

Viruses Blasting Cancer

Emily BurkeBiologics, Clinical Trials, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Development, Drug Targets, Mechanism of Action, Ribonucleic Acid (RNA)

Engineering Viruses To Attack Getting bacteria-eating viruses to combat antibiotic resistance isn’t the only way viruses are being hacked to defend team homo sapien. This week, we’ll turn our attention to another benevolent use of viruses: cancer-fighters known as oncolytic viruses. Oncolytic Virus Primer Oncolytic viruses are an immunotherapy — a type of therapy that harnesses the power of a patient’s immune system to combat a disease. … Read More

Decoding Your Genes

Emily BurkeBiotech Basics, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Diagnostics, Drug Approvals, Easily Confused, FDA, Genetics, Genomics, Orphan Disease, Term of the Week, The WEEKLY

The Skinny On DNA Testing 23andMe (Mountain View, CA) recently found itself back in the limelight after the disease risk section of its mail-in DNA kit received an OK from the FDA. The Silicon Valley biotech had to halt sales of its direct-to-consumer genetics testing back in 2013 after regulatory officials grew concerned over marketing claims and the possibility of consumers misinterpreting the test results. 23andMe rebooted a limited part of … Read More

RNA Therapeutics March Onward

Emily BurkeAntisense, Biotech Basics, Clinical Trials, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Development, Drug Targets, Mechanism of Action, Orphan Disease, Orphan Drugs, Ribonucleic Acid (RNA), The WEEKLY

Taking Steps With Antisense With their high specificity and relative low manufacturing cost, RNA therapeutics may be tomorrow’s biotech sweetheart. In fact, chances are good that previously “undruggable” targets that cannot be accessed by small or large molecule drugs, are now within reach. However, the main roadblock continues to be delivery—getting the RNA drug where it needs to be, in high enough concentrations, to … Read More

Putting The NA in DNA

Emily BurkeBiologics, Biotech Basics, Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, Clinical Trials, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Development, Drug Targets, Mechanism of Action, Monoclonal Antibodies, Ribonucleic Acid (RNA), Small Molecule Drugs, The WEEKLY

Nucleic Acid Therapeutics Small molecule, peptide, and biologic drugs aren’t the only players in the game of drug development. A fourth class of therapeutics differs from all three of these: nucleic acid-based drugs. These drugs are rising in prominence due to their potential to specifically target a wide range of diseases, including various types of cancer, autoimmune, and infectious diseases. Companies … Read More

The Science Of CRISPR/CAS9

Emily BurkeBiologics, Business of Biotech, Cancer, Clinical Trials, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Development, Drug Targets, Genomics, Mechanism of Action, Ribonucleic Acid (RNA), The WEEKLY

 CRISPR/CAS9 UPDATE CRISPR/Cas9 can’t seem to stay out of the news — from first in human to patent disputes, we here at the WEEKLY want to update you on this hot technology. A group of scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Proteomics (Beijing, China) and the National Center for Protein Sciences (Beijing, China) recently reported the first ever edit using CRISPR/Cas9 in healthy human … Read More

The PARP Race Is On

Emily BurkeCancer, Clinical Trials, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Approvals, Drug Development, Drug Targets, Easily Confused, FDA, Mechanism of Action, The WEEKLY

PARP1 INHIBITOR LINEUP PARP1 inhibitors are making a strong statement! Tesaro’s (Waltham, MA) just-approved Zejula has garnered predictions of blockbuster status. AstraZeneca’s (Cambridge, UK) Lynparza was the first PARP1 inhibitor to make it to market back in 2014, and their recent clinical trial results showed significant survival benefit in ovarian cancer. Clovis Oncology (Boulder, CO) achieved the second FDA approval of a PARP1 inhibitor with Rubraca in … Read More

The Intrigue Of HIF

Emily BurkeCancer, Clinical Trials, Cocktail Fodder, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Development, Drug Targets, Mechanism of Action, Small Molecule Drugs, Term of the Week, The WEEKLY

The Versatility Of HIFs Quite a few headlines touting a term called “HIF compound” or “hypoxia-inducible factor compound” have intrigued us here at WEEKLY headquarters. GlaxoSmithKline (London, England), Akebia Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA) and more have HIF-inducing drugs in the pipeline which may prove to be attractive alternatives to Amgen’s (Thousand Oaks, CA) injectable Epogen currently on the market. In earlier stages of research, HIFs are being studied for their connection to tumor … Read More

Cancer Vaccines & Game Changers

Emily BurkeBiologics, Cancer, Clinical Trials, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Development, Drug Targets, Genomics, Mechanism of Action, Term of the Week

The Elusive Cancer Vaccine The promise of cancer vaccines have proven to be elusive. A new crop of biotechs are hoping to change that by taking advantage of the latest advances in genomics. Scientists are working overtime trying to develop cancer vaccines that train the immune system to recognize and fight an established tumor. In this WEEKLY, we’ll break down the science … Read More

Post-translational Modifications In Biotech

Emily BurkeBiologics, Biomanufacturing, Biotech Basics, Cancer, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Development, Drug Targets, Mechanism of Action, Monoclonal Antibodies

Basic Science Meets Application “Post-translational modification” may not be a term you hear every day, but it is critically important to the biotech industry—from understanding how cancer develops to producing biologics. Breaking the term down, we know that: “post” means “after.” “translation” is “the cellular process of making proteins.” “modification” means “change.” So, a post-translational modification (PTM) simply means that … Read More

The First Three-Parent Baby

Emily BurkeCocktail Fodder, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), FDA

BREAKING DOWN THE SCIENCE & SCRUTINY “World’s First Three-Parent Baby” made headlines in publications ranging from Nature to CNN last week. This human interest story is of a baby boy born in Mexico with genetic material from three different parents, achieved by a technique known as three-parent in vitro fertilization (TPIVF). In this issue, we will explain why TPIVF is used … Read More

DMD Makes The Cut

Emily BurkeAntisense, Biologics, Clinical Trials, Cocktail Fodder, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Approvals, Drug Development, Drug Targets, FDA, Genetics, Mechanism of Action, Orphan Disease, Orphan Drugs, Ribonucleic Acid (RNA), The WEEKLY

The Science Behind Sarepta’s Hotly Debated Antisense Drug Sarepta’s (Cambridge, MA) Duchenne muscular dystrophy drug Exondys 51 crossed the finish line earlier this week, with a conditional stamp of approval by the FDA. This hotly debated regulatory result offers new hope for patients and families whose previous treatment options only managed the descent of the disease. Affecting one in approximately 3,500 … Read More

The Long And Short Of AMD

Emily BurkeBiologics, Clinical Trials, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA), Drug Development, Drug Targets, Genetics, Mechanism of Action, Monoclonal Antibodies, Term of the Week, The WEEKLY

A Spotlight On One Of The Most Prevalent Eye Diseases It’s easy to take our ability to see for granted. On a day-to-day basis, we rely on vision to process information and to navigate the world without giving it a second thought. For the millions of people affected by eye disease, vision loss, and blindness, impaired vision is a daily reality … Read More